Queries#

The search in Rubrix is driven by Elasticsearch’s powerful query string syntax. It allows you to perform simple fuzzy searches of words and phrases, or complex queries taking full advantage of Rubrix’s data model.

These queries can be used in the search bar of the Rubrix web app, or with the Python client as optional arguments.

Search fields#

An important concept when searching with Elasticsearch is the field concept. Every search term in Rubrix is directed to a specific field of the record’s underlying data model. For example, writing text:fox in the search bar will search for records with the word fox in the field text.

If you do not provide any fields in your query string, by default Rubrix will search in the text field. For a complete list of available fields and their content, have a look at the field glossary below.

Note

The default behavior when not specifying any fields in the query string changed in version >=0.16.0. Before this version, Rubrix searched in a mixture of the the deprecated word and word.extended fields that allowed searches for special characters like ! and .. If you want to search for special characters now, you have to spcify the text.exact field. For example, this is the query if you want to search for words with an exclamation mark in the end: text.exact:*\!

text and text.exact#

The (arguably) most important fields are the text and text.exact fields. They both contain the text of the records, however in two different forms:

  • the text field uses Elasticsearch’s standard analyzer that ignores capitalization and removes most of the punctuatio;

  • the text.exact field uses the whitespace analyzer that differentiates between lower and upper case, and does take into account punctuation;

Let’s have a look at a few examples. Suppose we have 2 records with the following text:

  1. The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.

  2. THE LAZY DOG HATED THE QUICK BROWN FOX!

Now consider these queries:

  • text:dog. or text:fox: matches both of the records.

  • text.exact:dog or text.exact:FOX: matches none of the records.

  • text.exact:dog. or text.exact:fox: matches only the first record.

  • text.exact:DOG or text.exact:FOX\!: matches only the second record.

You can see how the text.exact field can be used to search in a more fine-grained manner.

TextClassificationRecord’s inputs#

For text classification records you can take advantage of the multiple inputs when performing a search. For example, if we uploaded records with inputs={"subject": ..., "body": ...}, you can direct your searches to only one of those inputs by specifying the inputs.subject or inputs.body field in your query. So to look for records in which the subject contains the word news, you would search for

  • inputs.subject:news

Again, as with the text field, you can also use the white space analyzer to perform more fine-grained searches by specifying the exact field:

  • inputs.subject.exact:NEWS

Words and phrases#

Apart from single words you can also search for phrases by surrounding multiples words with double quotes. This searches for all the words in the phrase, in the same order.

If we take the two examples from above, then following query will only return the second example:

  • text:"lazy dog hated"

Metadata fields#

You also have the metadata of your records available when performing a search. Imagine you provided the split to which the record belongs to as metadata, that is metadata={"split": "train"} or metadata={"split": "test"}. Then you could only search your training data by specifying the corresponding field in your query:

  • metadata.split:train

Metadata are indexed as keywords. This means you cannot search for single words in them, and capitalization and punctuations are taken into account. You can, however, use wild cards.

Filters as query string#

Just like the metadata, you can also use the filter fields in you query. A few examples to emulate the filters in the query string are:

  • status:Validated

  • annotated_as:HAM

  • predicted_by:Model A

The field values are treated as keywords, that is you cannot search for single words in them, and capitalization and punctuations are taken into account. You can, however, use wild cards.

Combine terms and fields#

You can combine an arbitrary amount of terms and fields in your search using the familiar boolean operators AND, OR and NOT. Following examples showcase the power of these operators:

  • text:(quick AND fox): Returns records that contain the word quick and fox. The AND operator is the default operator, so text:(quick fox) is equivalent.

  • text:(quick OR brown): Returns records that contain either the word quick or brown.

  • text:(quick AND fox AND NOT news): Returns records that contain the words quick and fox, and do not contain news.

  • metadata.split:train AND text:fox: Returns records that contain the word fox and that have a metadata “split: train”.

  • NOT _exists_:metadata.split : Returns records that don’t have a metadata split.

Query string features#

The query string syntax has many powerful features that you can use to create complex searches. Following is just a hand selected subset of the many features you can look up on the official Elasticsearch documentation.

Wildcards#

Wildcard searches can be run on individual search terms, using ? to replace a single character, and * to replace zero or more characters:

  • text:(qu?ck bro*)

  • text.exact:"Lazy Dog*": Matches, for example, “Lazy Dog”, “Lazy Dog.”, or “Lazy Dogs”.

  • inputs.\*:news: Searches all input fields for the word news.

Regular expressions#

Regular expression patterns can be embedded in the query string by wrapping them in forward slashes “/”:

  • text:/joh?n(ath[oa]n)/: Matches jonathon, jonathan, johnathon, and johnathan.

The supported regular expression syntax is explained on the official Elasticsearch documentation.

Fuzziness#

You can search for terms that are similar to, but not exactly like the search terms, using the fuzzy operator. This is useful to cover human misspellings:

  • text:quikc~: Matches quick and quikc.

Ranges#

Ranges can be specified for date, numeric or string fields. Inclusive ranges are specified with square brackets and exclusive ranges with curly brackets:

  • score:[0.5 TO 0.6]

  • score:{0.9 TO *}

Escaping special characters#

The query string syntax has some reserved characters that you need to escape if you want to search for them. The reserved characters are: + - = && || > < ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \ / For instance, to search for “(1+1)=2” you need to write:

  • text:\(1\+1\)\=2

Field glossary#

This is a table with available fields that you can use in your query string:

Field name

Description

TextClass.

TokenClass.

Text2Text

annotated_as

annotation

annotated_by

annotation agent

event_timestamp

timestamp

id

id

inputs.*

inputs

metadata.*

metadata

last_updated

date of the last update

predicted_as

prediction

predicted_by

prediction agent

score

prediction score

status

status

text

text, standard analyzer

text.exact

text, whitespace analyzer

tokens

tokens

-

-

-

-

-

metrics.text_lengt

Input text length

metrics.tokens.idx

Token idx in record

metrics.tokens.value

Text of the token

metrics.tokens.char_start

Start char idx of token

metrics.tokens.char_end

End char idx of token

metrics.annotated.mentions.value

Text of the mention (annotation)

metrics.annotated.mentions.label

Label of the mention (annotation)

metrics.annotated.mentions.score

Score of the mention (annotation)

metrics.annotated.mentions.capitalness

Mention capitalness (annotation)

metrics.annotated.mentions.density

Local mention density (annotation)

metrics.annotated.mentions.tokens_length

Mention length in tokens (annotation)

metrics.annotated.mentions.chars_length

Mention length in chars (annotation)

metrics.annotated.tags.value

Text of the token (annotation)

metrics.annotated.tags.tag

IOB tag (annotation)

metrics.predicted.mentions.value

Text of the mention (prediction)

metrics.predicted.mentions.label

Label of the mention (prediction)

metrics.predicted.mentions.score

Score of the mention (prediction)

metrics.predicted.mentions.capitalness

Mention capitalness (prediction)

metrics.predicted.mentions.density

Local mention density (prediction)

metrics.predicted.mentions.tokens_length

Mention length in tokens (prediction)

metrics.predicted.mentions.chars_length

Mention length in chars (prediction)

metrics.predicted.tags.value

Text of the token (prediction)

metrics.predicted.tags.tag

IOB tag (prediction)